Biochar & Biofuels

Many forests in the Pacific Northwest are overstocked with trees, to their detriment of their ecological health. Removing them is critical to improving tree growth, enhancing wildlife habitat, and reducing wildlife risk. But the challenge is often how to pay for that thinning, particularly when the trees are too small to mill as sawlogs, and they are distant from a pulp mill. One emerging commercial opportunity for this perceived “low value” material is to turn it into biochar, a form of charcoal used as a soil amendment. Another option is to burn it for energy as biofuel. These resources explain more about how to decide whether these opportunities might be right for you.

latest news & Events

The Death Cycle of the Salmon

Edit
If you’re hoping to spot salmon in the forest this season, a creek or river is your best bet. But if you limit your searches to fin-spotting at the water’s edge, you’re missing out on the full experience. Don’t forget to look to the trees.

Continue »

Making a Good Co-Home

There’s a hint of expectation in the air around Lousignont Creek, located in the northern Oregon Coast Range.Sometime in the next two months, adult coho salmon will appear as if out of nowhere and struggle upstream in search of suitable gravel for spawning.

Continue »

CONNECT WITH US

Sign up for our monthly newsletter and get the latest information about our programs, special events and other news.

* Required Fields