NNRG logo and tagline

SNOW FOR TREES AND WATERSHEDS

SNOW FOR TREES AND WATERSHEDS

WITH DRIER SUMMER SOILS CAUSING TREE STRESS, HOW CAN PRACTICAL FORESTRY TECHNIQUES INCREASE WATER AVAILABILITY?

WITH DRIER SUMMER SOILS CAUSING TREE STRESS, HOW CAN PRACTICAL FORESTRY TECHNIQUES INCREASE WATER AVAILABILITY?

Maintaining a steady and reliable source of water in a changing climate is critical for the health of both people and ecosystems. At several sites in Washington, including the Nisqually Community Forest near Mount Rainier, we have been demonstrating methods of ecological forestry that can increase the resilience of future watershed forests. 

  1. Thinning the forest to spread available soil moisture among fewer trees,
  2. Installing snow gaps so that more snow accumulates and extends snowmelt season
  3. Planting seedlings from warmer zones to provide a local source for adapted genetic traits

Nisqually Community Forest was once managed as an industrial timber plantation. The techniques above are part of our overall plan to restore the forest while also making it more resilient to the predicted future climate in the area.

Learn more about this project at the links below.

GO WITH THE SNOW: WINTER FOREST MONITORING RESULTS

The future is looking drier, and the trees are taking notice. With climate change creating warmer and drier summers, how can we use forestry techniques to increase snowpack and slow snowmelt for water availability? This question led us at NNRG to create an experiment in practical forestry methods, in collaboration with several partners.

Read More »

Ecological Forestry Techniques for Hotter, Drier Times

How do we address past mismanagement while also preparing for the future climate?
Northwest Natural Resource Group and partners are launching a new demonstration project to test techniques that can help forests better endure the kinds of climatic change that we expect in the Pacific Northwest.

Read More »