Funding for Forest Stewardship: EQIP

Application deadlines for 2019 EQIP funding:

Oregon – March 15, 2019 & May 17th, 2019

Washington – February 15, 2019 & April 19, 2019

 Although applications are accepted on a year-round basis, those interested have two cut-off dates to submit their applications for consideration for funding in fiscal year 2019.

What’s EQIP?

The Environmental Quality Incentives Program (EQIP) is a technical and financial assistance program managed by the USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service.

EQIP helps forest owners access technical expertise to develop and complete conservation practices that improve the health and productivity of their land.

EQIP is a cost-share reimbursement program. Cost-share means that a government entity invests in a portion of the expenses of conservation practices by reimbursing landowners for a percentage of agreed-upon costs. For example, forest owners use EQIP to pay for materials, equipment, consultants, and labor to complete a practice.

EQIP-funded conservation practices include the following:

  • Develop a comprehensive forest management plan
  • Reduce fuels
  • Plant trees and shrubs
  • Remove invasive species
  • Pre-commercial thin
  • Create snags, downed wood and habitat piles
  • Treat forest slash
  • Pruning
  • Reduce erosion and sediment to streams
  • Fish passage projects
  • Bird nesting boxes
  • Plant hedgerows
  • Improve pollinator habitat

Who can apply?

Private non-industrial forest landowners – including families, small businesses, non-profits, land trusts and conservation organizations – that harvest less than 2,000 mbf per year.


How to apply

NRCS accepts applications for EQIP on a continuous basis; however there are cutoff dates to receive funding for a given year. The application process is competitive. Contact your local NRCS office to determine your eligibility, learn about priority practices for your region, and discuss the practices you want to do in your forest.

Applications are accepted on a rolling basis. Get your application for 2019 funding started today by contacting your local NRCS office’s District Conservationist!

To learn more about the EQIP program in your state go to:

Here’s an example of an EQIP Application. Contact your NRCS District Conservationist for help applying! Learn more about working with NRCS.


What EQIP can do for you


Work with a Technical Service Provider

A Technical Service Provider (TSP) is a private forestry consultant who is certified by NRCS to develop Conservation Activity Plans and oversee EQIP projects. Landowners hire TSPs to develop and implement EQIP-funded conservation practices.

EQIP provides a set reimbursement rate to forest owners to help defer the cost of hiring a private consultant (TSP). NNRG’s field staff and select Preferred Providers are TSPs with NRCS.

Recommended TSPs in Washington:

Kirk Hanson
kirk@nnrg.org
360-316-9317

Rick Helman
rick@nnrg.org
360-951-1012

Recommended TSPs in Oregon:

Stay tuned as we update our preferred provider list for Oregon TSPs.

For additional Technical Service Providers, go to the NRCS directory.

More info about selecting a Technical Service Provider – Fact Sheet for Landowners
More info about serving as a Technical Service Provider – Fact Sheet for Providers

EQIP Conservation Activity Plan reimbursement rates for FY 2019

 

A Story of Success

Paul Butler of Butler Family Forest shares his story about how EQIP played a major role in his forest management:

“My wife and I own the land with another couple. Initially, we had planned to divide the land and each build houses. After a few years, that plan changed. Our co-owners moved to California, and my wife and I decided to stay where we were (it’s only a few miles from our home). For a few years, we were all content to just let the forest grow, but were troubled by the high property taxes. So I wrote a forest management plan and got the property enrolled in the current use taxation program for long-term forestry; big difference in taxes!

“About that time, I heard a presentation by Ian Hanna and Kirk Hanson on NNRG, and how they could help me obtain an EQIP grant. We qualified for the grant starting in 2008, and it helped me focus my efforts with a sequence of tasks that I agreed were useful. Management options were explained in detail, but ultimately the choice was mine, in terms of which ones I wanted to accomplish. Kirk has served as my technical service provider since the beginning; I really appreciate that continuity.

“While I was teaching at The Evergreen State College, a number of student groups came out to see our operation. As the land is adjacent to Capitol Forest, it provides an interesting contrast between industrial forestry, and small-scale private holdings. Students have also set up permanent monitoring plots, and assisted with thinning and planting. The grant has almost run its course. When complete, I plan to apply for another EQIP grant to assist with writing a new forest-management plan.”

View full article about the Butler’s 2013 EQIP project here.

Join a nearby EQIP Local Working Group

Local working groups provide recommendations for consideration on local natural resource priorities and criteria for USDA conservation activities and programs but the data could be useful to many organizations.
 
At least once per year, the local working group hosts a gathering to discuss natural resource issues, opportunities, and priorities. NRCS considers these recommendations from the local working group discussions, along with technical expertise and national and State program policies, to develop the local NRCS conservation programs.
 
The results of these meetings have potential implications on not only how NRCS spends its dollars as an agency locally, but also on recommended treatments to improve the natural resource conditions of private agricultural lands, forests, and other associated agricultural lands.

WASHINGTON

Region
Counties
Upcoming meetings
District Conservationist
Northwest
Snohomish, Whatcom, Skagit, San Juan Islands, Whidbey Island, Clallam, Jefferson
Wednesday, March 5, 2019 | 10 am to 1pm | Padilla Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve, 10441 Bayview Edison Rd, Mt Vernon, WA
Sarah Tanuvasa | 360-428-7684, ext. 131
Puget Sound
Thurston, Kitsap, Mason, Pierce, King
Wednesday, March 13, 2019 | 9:00am | Olympia Service Center 1835 Black Lake Blvd. SW, Suite E., Olympia, WA 98512
Amy Hendershot | 253-256-6741
Southwest
Clark, Underwood (Skamania), Lewis County, Cowlitz, Pacific, Wahkiakum, Grays Harbor
No meetings scheduled
David Rose | 360-748-0084, ext. 101

OREGON

County
Upcoming meetings
District Conservationist
Lane
Tuesday, February 12, 2019 | 10am - Noon | Lane Electric 787 Bailey Hill Road, Eugene, OR 97402
Thomas Snyder | 541-801-2671
Linn & Benton
Wednesday, February 6, 2019 | Two sessions: 1-4pm & 6-8pm | Linn County Extension, 33630 McFarland Road, Tangent OR
Amy Kaiser | 541-801-2671
Marion
No meetings scheduled
Les Bachelor | 971-273-4816
Wasco
No meetings scheduled
Dan Esposito | (541) 298-8559, ext. 111
Polk
Friday, Jan. 25, 2019 | 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. | Polk Co. Extension Office | Dalla, OR
Evelyn Conrad | 503-837-3689
Clackamas & Multnomah
No meetings scheduled
Kim Galland | 503-210-6032
Yamhill
Wednesday, December 12, 2018 | 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. | Miller Woods Conference Room | 15580 NW Orchard View Rd | McMinnville, OR
Thomas Hoskins | 503-376-7605
Tillamook
Tuesday, February 19, 2018 | 10am - 2pm | POTB Conference Room, 4000 Blimp Blvd, Tillamook, OR
Mitch Cummings | 503-842-2848, ext. 107
Washington
No meetings scheduled.
Jessica Wells | 503-207-7949
Clatsop
No meetings scheduled
Vacant
Columbia
Thursday, January 31, 2019 | 1 to 3 p.m. | USDA Service Center | 35285 Millard Rd. | St. Helens, OR
Don Mehlhoff | (503) 438-3146
Douglas County
Wednesday, Feb. 6, 2019 | 9 a.m. | OR Dept. of Fish & Wildlife | 4192 N. Umpqua Hwy | Roseburg, OR 97470
David Ferguson | 541-378-3536

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