Author: NNRG

Workshop: You Bought a Forest, So Now What? – April 23 & 30

Owning forestland has been your dream, but now that the land is yours where do you start? This workshop will introduce you to the natural history and ecology of western Washington and Oregon forests and provide key information for starting to assess and manage your land. You’ll also come away with a framework of ideas, tasks, and resources to help meet your forest stewardship goals and enhance your ownership experience. Come learn from regional experts and local practitioners in this interactive class.   Topics this class will cover include: Pacific Northwest forest ecology Tree identification and natural history of native

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Member Spotlight: Learning the ways of their dream forest

For years, Tod and Gerie Lemkuhl loved exploring Mount Rainier National Park and dreamed of some-day stewarding a wild forest akin to the park’s cathedrals of lush old-growth. Seven years ago they knew it was time to turn “someday” into reality. So they sold their home in Seattle, purchased 20 acres of forest near Eatonville and started to get to know the land. As the Lemkuhls embarked on their journey, they learned to use active management to steward the forest of their dreams. At first the Lemkuhls got to know their forest by camping out and spending time building trails,

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So, You Own a Forest?

Forests offer us inspiration and a connection to the land – one that renews us and often reminds us we have put in a day’s good work. Owning a forest can be a source of beauty, relaxation, recreation, and income for you and your family. There are many simple things that you can do to make your forest a better place to visit, attract more wildlife, and contribute to its upkeep.   Join us and start your stewardship journey with guidance from regional specialists and fellow woodland owners. Woodlands can be managed on a regenerative cycle that allows for healthy ecosystem functions, wildlife

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By the Numbers: 2015 Accomplishments

2015 was a productive year! Northwest Certified Forestry members showed their dedication to stewarding Pacific Northwest forests with ecologically-minded practices that contribute to the regional economy. We are so inspired by the forest stewards in our community who worked to enhance habitat for threatened and endangered species, remove invasive species, plant native seedlings and shrubs, pursue new markets, and do what it takes to nurture and sustain complex forest structure. Here are some highlights: Our Community 160 members across more than 162,000 acres in Washington and Oregon, More than 100 family forests and small businesses 12 youth camps and education centers 11

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Protecting Forests and Clean Drinking Water along Lake St. Clair

People need forests. They make our oxygen, clean our water, limit flooding, and absorb carbon. They evoke mental well-being and are part of our cultural identities. Protecting the ecosystem services that forests and other invaluable biotic communities provide is integral to our future. Often, we can take for granted the significance of what forested ecosystems contribute to our region. Enter this under recognized niche, are the scientists and economists who are translating the functions of ecosystems into a more comprehensible currency. A 2009 study by Earth Economics found that every year, the Nisqually Watershed provides between $288 million and $4.2

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Thank You Thursday – Reuben’s Brews

March 24, 2016 – 3:00 to 8:00pm Reuben’s Brews – 5010 14th Ave NW, Seattle, WA 98107 Drink beer to save forests! Join us for Thank You Thursday at Reuben’s Brews. We’re celebrating great forests that contribute to great beer. Reuben’s Brews uses water from the South Fork Tolt Watershed, a Forest Stewardship Council® certified forest managed by Seattle Public Utilities. The forested watershed supplies about 30% of the drinking water for 1.3 million people in and around Seattle. The watershed is FSC® certified through a group certificate managed by Northwest Natural Resource Group (FSC-C008225). Reuben’s will donate $1.00 from

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FSC Your Valentine’s Day

However you choose to spend February 14th The Forest Stewardship CouncilⓇ (FSCⓇ) certifies forests and forest products that meet stringent standards of environmental sustainability. What better way to celebrate your loved one than with these luxurious picks? Go on a date in an FSC certified forest: Turtleback Mountain | Orcas Island, WA Discovery Park | Seattle, WA Seward Park | Seattle, WA Carkeek Park | Seattle WA Schmitz Park | Seattle, WA Commodore Park | Seattle, WA Cowling Creek Forest Preserve | Poulsbo, WA Ueland Tree Farm | Bremerton, WA Klingel Wetlands Wildlife Refuge | Belfair, WA Tiger Mountain State Forest: Issaquah, WA Island Center Forest | Vashon Island, WA Ellsworth Preserve | Naselle, WA Northwest Trek | Eatonville, WA Mashel River | Eatonville, WA Nisqually

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Workshop: Emerging Biofuel Options for San Juan Forests

Join us to learn about ways to improve your forest’s health and use low value wood! Register today: http://sanjuans-biofuels.eventbrite.com Often there are significant byproducts from forest management and restoration treatments that amount to slash and other woody biomass left on the ground. This low value material includes small diameter trees, limbs, needles, leaves, and other woody parts. Many forests in the San Juan Islands are severely overstocked with a considerable assortment of low value material that is a potential fire hazard and limits biodiversity. Learn what you can do with this non-commercial wood material. This workshop will present new ways to use

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Member Spotlight: Nisqually State Park

To restore ecological complexity to a forest, you need good partners and often, you need to cut a few trees. Last summer, Washington State Parks & Recreation Commission worked with the University of Washington’s Pack Forest, WA State Department of Natural Resources, and WyEast Timber Services to conduct an ecologically-based harvest project on 104 acres of Nisqually State Park. State Parks’ goal for the project was to improve forest health by enhancing the biodiversity of the forest. The restoration treatment used a silvicultural method known as a variable density thinning (VDT) and created half-acre to 1-acre gaps where all the Douglas-fir were

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Winter: Forestry through the Seasons

Winter is a wonderful time to be out in your woods! Without leaves, you’ll have visibility to notice summer’s successes as well as potential issues for the coming dry season. By walking your woods and planning for spring, winter can be restorative and productive for you and your forest. Walk your Woods Straighten up tree cages Check for how planted seedlings are doing – learn more  Monitor stream health First steps for your stream Check bank stability Look for erosion, vegetation along bank Check water clarity Continuing steps Take the water temperature Start measuring stream flow Get to know your bugs

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2016 Native Plant Sales

It’s time to think about spring planting! Which native plants will restore forest health, provide wildlife value, and add vibrant beauty to your woodland? Find a native plant sale near you for a diverse array of seedlings – and make sure you preorder to get all the plants you want!

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Saving a few good oaks

We found this short film inspirational. Especially considering the efforts of our Forest Stewardship Council® certified members who are committed to restoring oak habitat in the Willamette Valley, the Puget Trough, and the San Juan Islands. These stewards have removed Douglas-fir trees that established after years of fire suppression, thinned small diameter Oregon white oaks (a.k.a. Garry oaks, Quercus garryana), and planted native grasses and flowers all in effort to restore oak savanna and woodland ecology. They’ve spent countless days removing Scots broom and Himalayan blackberry from the under-story and mid-story of their forest. Oregon white oak ecosystems are among the most endangered ecological communities in

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Member Spotlight: Turning nothing into something

In our Member Spotlight series, we highlight NNRG members who have used forest products for unique and entrepreneurial purposes on their land and within their communities. Often these projects help members earn supplemental income. For the third installment in the series, we introduce you to Oak Basin Tree Farm, a Forest Stewardship Council® certified member of our group certificate, who has sourced non-timber forest products from their woods to local markets. Oak Basin Tree Farm Through much hard work and creative ideas, brothers Jim and Ed Merzenich have the seemingly magical ability to turn nothing into something. Their skills in alchemy are abundantly evident throughout the restoration work and the non-timber forest products they sell

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From stump to Stumptown

The farm-to-table movement resonates with citizens of the Pacific Northwest. We shop at local farmers markets, participate in CSAs, buy eggs from our neighbors who raise chickens. We care so much about where our food comes from – and its well-being – that the show Portlandia pokes fun at us Oregonians and Washingtonians wanting to “meet the chicken” on our plate. But can we extend the farm-to-table concept to the next level of sustainable sourcing? Forest-to-building? Stump-to-siding? Tree-to-floor? At NNRG, we believe it’s important to have confidence and take comfort in knowing where our wood products come from. Meeting the stump and walking through the forest from which the

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Workshop: Optimize the Value of Your Timber – November 7

Recognizing the value of the timber you have can be the difference between selling a veneer-grade log at pulp prices instead of the market premium. By understanding the specialty product markets for veneer, figured wood, pole-quality timber, and export logs you can extract the highest value for your timber. It’s important to understand the niche markets that exist around you, the log manufacturing process, and what you can do right now to optimize for long-term timber value and specialty forest products. Attend this class to learn specific practices you can do to grow quality wood and obtain the highest value for

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From the Field: Precision tree felling video

Forestry Director Kirk Hanson is on Orcas Island hosting the precision tree felling and low-impact yarding courses at YMCA Camp Orkila this week (9/24-26). Ken Lallemont of Timber Resource is instructing the courses and providing hands on guidance to students. It’s an intensive 2-3 days of training to learn the art and science of tree felling and tree extraction. Many of the folks who take the class go on to do their own timber harvests, take down trees for firewood, and thin their forests to create space and allow light to reach the forest floor. Learning to fell trees is also an application of understanding

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Member Spotlight: A few sheep and EQIP help steward the forest

By Christina Davis and NNRG Steve and Linnea Bensel of Nootka Rose Farm steward 32 acres of forest on Waldron Island in the San Juans. In recent years, they accessed cost-share funds through the Natural Resources Conservation Service to develop a forest management plan and do a pre-commercial thinning in their forest. They also channel the appetites of a few woolly ruminants to stymy invasive ivy.  Steve and his wife, Linnea, both grew up as stewards of the land: Linnea’s mother was an avid gardener and Steve’s parents farmed when he was a child, informing his decision at the age of 4 to become a farmer himself. In short, the

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Member Spotlight: Shiitake Mushroom Logs

In our Member Spotlight series, we highlight Northwest Certified Forestry (NCF) members who have used forest products for unique and entrepreneurial purposes on their land and within their communities. Often these projects help members earn supplemental income. For the second installment in the series, we introduce you to Gopher Valley Botanicals, a Forest Stewardship Council® certified member of our group certificate, who has sourced non-timber forest products from her woods to local markets. Gopher Valley Botanicals   Located amid the rolling foothills of Yamhill County in the western Willamette Valley, Gopher Valley Botanicals (GVB) stewards a 20-acre forest comprised of Douglas-fir, Oregon white oak, and a wooded wetland. The landowners take an active management

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Member Spotlight: Large woody debris & wetland restoration

In our Member Spotlight series, we highlight Northwest Certified Forestry (NCF) members who are improving ecosystem functions and who have cultivated forest products for unique and entrepreneurial purposes on their land and within their communities. In this edition, we introduce you to Digger Mountain Forestry-a Forest Stewardship Council® certified member of our group certificate, and Yankee Creek Forestry-an NCF Preferred Provider. Recently, these members provided woody debris for restoration projects focused on salmon habitat and wetland recovery in the Willamette Valley and the Southern Oregon Coast. Digger Mountain Forestry   Digger Mountain Forestry stewards 650 acres of forest in Oregon’s Coast Range. In recent years Northwest Certified Foresty has put out calls

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Growing biologically rich forests for wildlife and income

On a beautiful summer day in early June, woodland owners gathered inside the library at Sedro-Woolley High School for the Managing for Timber and Wildlife workshop. The more than 20 participants were there to learn from Rolf Gersonde and Ken Bevis, two experts in the fields of silviculture and wildlife biology. Rolf Gersonde, a renowned silviculturist and researcher for the City of Seattle’s Cedar River Watershed presented first, focusing mainly on sustainable forest management practices. He explained that creating stands that are diverse in age, class, and species would not only serve as sanctuary to many different types of wildlife but would also

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