Author: NNRG

Restoring watershed ecosystems at Tarboo Forest

Northwest Watershed Institute (NWI), a Port Townsend-based non-profit, leads the work to regrow old-growth forests in the uplands of Tarboo Creek and re-establish forested wetlands in the floodplain. Over the years, NWI has quilted together Tarboo Wildlife Preserve, 396 acres in the Tarboo valley near Quilicene, Washington.

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Get Outside! Enjoying FSC®-Certified Forests

We are fortunate that many Forest Stewardship Council®-certified forests in the Pacific Northwest are open for public enjoyment. These lands offer an opportunity for all of us to know what healthy forests look and feel like. Here’s a list of FSC-certified forests that are open to the public.

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Spring: Forestry through the Seasons

It’s nearly officially spring, so get ready to greet the return of the growing season! Each season presents the best time to conduct different stewardship activities. Timing your forest management for the ideal season will help you achieve success and avoid setbacks. This page provides tips to help you make the most of stewarding your forest in spring. As a reminder, bird nesting season begins around March 15th, so try to avoid any major timber management until chicks have left their nests around mid- to late-June. By spring, the window for planting is closing: make sure you get your tree seedlings

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Working with Partners on Rare Habitats

This article, by Jim Merzenich of Oak Basin Tree Farm, was first published in the Fall 2020 edition of Northwest Woodlands, a publication of the Oregon Small Woodlands, Washington Farm Forestry, Idaho Forest Owners & Montana Forest Owners Associations. Northwest Woodlands magazine is a benefit of membership in one of these associations – click on the links above to learn more and join! The article is reprinted with permission. Oak Basin Tree Farm is a member of NNRG’s group FSC® certificate.  By Jim Merzenich Oregon white oak (Quercus garryana) stands are some of the rarest natural habitats in the Northwest.

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Helping Your Forest Through Dry Times

The drier and hotter years ahead don’t have to spell trouble for the forests you steward. From recognizing and responding to drought stress in trees to planting tree species from other regions, there are steps you can take to mitigate the impacts of climate change in your forest.

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2018 Accomplishments by the Numbers

2018 was a productive year for NNRG and the forests our members steward! We are so inspired by the landowners and managers in our community who worked to enhance habitat for threatened and endangered species, removed invasive species, planted a diverse array of native seedlings and shrubs, and pursued new markets for local wood products. These are highlights from 2018.

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Resources for San Juan County Forest Owners

Northwest Natural Resource Group and our partners have hosted ecological forestry workshops in the San Juan Islands since 2012. These resources are specifically for San Juan County forest owners who are interested in learning techniques to reduce fire risk, increase forest value, manage timber sales, market forest products, and improve the ecological and economic health of island forests.

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New Year’s Resolutions for Forest Owners

These days, typical New Year resolutions include exercising more and making time to be outside with nature. It’s also common for forest owners to have a “been meaning to do” list for their land. Thus, forest owners are especially fortunate as they can accomplish three goals in one effort by getting out for a walk in their woods to spend time in nature and observe their forest. All the better that they can prioritize forest stewardship activities for the new year.

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Spring 2019 Native Plant Sales

The late autumn and winter wet season in the Pacific Northwest is an ideal time to plant young trees and native shrubs! Planting native trees and shrubs enhances forest biodiversity by providing habitat for wildlife and forage for pollinators. Find a native plant sale near you for a diverse array of seedlings and shrubs suited to your region. Make sure you pre-order as soon as possible to get the plants you want!

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Workshop: Energy Opportunities for Woody Biomass

Wildfire risk across San Juan County is at an all-time high – largely due to increasingly overstocked forests. Thinning excess woody biomass from densely stocked forests can reduce wildfire risk while presenting an opportunity for local, sustainable energy production.

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Where Certified Logs Come From … and Where They Are Sold

Across Oregon and Washington, more than 600,000 acres of forestland are certified as “well managed” by the standards of the Forest Stewardship Council® (FSC®). And yet, much of the wood harvested from these forests doesn’t make it to the consumer with its certification intact. In many cases, these logs are sold into the generic wood market and don’t receive any special recognition when turned into lumber, plywood, or furniture. For NNRG, with our 190,000-acre group certificate that now covers a larger area than any other in the Pacific Northwest, that is a grave disappointment, and it affects about 90 percent

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Using the SuperACE Tool for the Skokomish Tribe

Much of NNRG’s effort this spring has focused on our work for the Skokomish Tribe on the Tribe’s forestland located at the south end of Hood Canal. To help the Tribe achieve its management goals, we’ve completed a timber appraisal and are planning the first commercial thinning on tribal lands in a couple decades. NNRG is applying the “thin from below” method in the commercial timber harvest: harvesting smaller, suppressed trees and leaving the larger dominant trees with more light, space and nutrients to thrive. We’ll also be removing trees displaying signs of root rot to help reduce the spread of the

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Cedar Row Farm

Eve Lonnquist can often be found working in the woods, just like her grandmother, who bought Cedar Row Farm in 1919 for $2000 and planted its namesake row of cedars. Nestled in the Nehalem River foothills, the 160-acre forest is stewarded by Eve, her two brothers and her partner Lynn Baker. The family enjoys taking care of the land and balances multiple goals, including recreation and income from timber harvest as well as providing wildlife habitat. They are FSC-certified through NNRG’s group certificate and are members of the Oregon Woodland Cooperative, selling bundled firewood to grocery stores around the Portland

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FSC-Certified Northwest Forests

NNRG’s group certificate for forests meeting the Forest Stewardship Council® standards covers more than 190,000 acres in 86 different ownerships across Oregon and Washington. The forests certified by NNRG are depicted as dark blue circles in the map above. In addition, another 420,000 acres in the two states are certified under other auspices, including the South Puget planning unit of Washington Department of Natural Resources, EFM, the Coquille Tribe, the Collins Lakeview Forest, Joint Base Lewis-McChord, and Oregon-based forestry consultants Trout Mountain Forestry. For a list of lands that are FSC-certified through NNRG’s group certificate, click here. For a selection of NNRG member profiles, click here.

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Measuring Timber and Woody Biomass in San Juan Forests

Techniques to estimate the volume of timber and woody biomass in your forest Saturday, April 28, 2018 10:30am-5pm Lopez Island   Understanding which trees and how many to remove from your forest is critical to a successful thinning project. This workshop will introduce participants to strategies for installing forest inventory plots and collecting the right data to calculate timber volumes. Participants will learn how to distinguish trees that merchantable and options for utilizing non-merchantable woody biomass. This workshop is the second in a three-part series on woody biomass in the San Juans. All forest owners are encouraged to attend, regardless of past participation. You may

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Workshop: Energy Opportunities for Woody Biomass

Options for San Juans Forest Owners REGISTER TODAY! Woody biomass in densely stocked San Juan forests may present an opportunity to support local energy needs. This workshop will discuss examples of community-based energy projects from throughout the Pacific Northwest. Learn about the cost-effective methods for converting biomass into energy to heat and power our houses, businesses, and communities. Topics include: Energy uses for woody biomass Comparing woody biomass to conventional fuels Different forms of woody biomass: firewood to pellets to chips Community cooperative business models for woody biomass energy Heating public facilities with woody biomass Emissions and clean air concerns

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Workshop: Biochar 101-Making Biochar from Woody Biomass

Benefits for Farms and Forests Learn How to Make Biochar: REGISTER TODAY! Biochar, a charcoal made from woody biomass that stores carbon and improves soil, is an emerging option for forest owners to generate income and remove excess wood from densely stocked forests. Biochar can increase agricultural productivity, improve soil fertility, and help mitigate climate change. This workshop will take you through the steps to turn low-value branches, twigs, and other woody biomass into valuable biochar. We’ll also cover potential business strategies that are working for San Juan county biochar producers as well as findings in the latest biochar research. This

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