Author: NNRG

Where Certified Logs Come From … and Where They Are Sold

Across Oregon and Washington, more than 600,000 acres of forestland are certified as “well managed” by the standards of the Forest Stewardship Council® (FSC®). And yet, much of the wood harvested from these forests doesn’t make it to the consumer with its certification intact. In many cases, these logs are sold into the generic wood market and don’t receive any special recognition when turned into lumber, plywood, or furniture. For NNRG, with our 190,000-acre group certificate that now covers a larger area than any other in the Pacific Northwest, that is a grave disappointment, and it affects about 90 percent

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Northwest Watershed Institute’s Tarboo Forest

Restoring Tarboo Creek and protecting its headwaters has been a decades-long community-wide conservation effort to ensure that both forest and stream flourish for fish and wildlife.   Northwest Watershed Institute (NWI), a Port Townsend-based non-profit, leads the work to regrow old-growth forests in the uplands of Tarboo Creek and re-establish forested wetlands in the floodplain. Over the years, NWI has quilted together Tarboo Wildlife Preserve, 396 acres in the Tarboo valley near Quilicene, Washington. The Tarboo preserve is part of a 4,600-acre patchwork of protected lands that include both public and private ownerships around Dabob Bay along the north end

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Using the SuperACE Tool for the Skokomish Tribe

Much of NNRG’s effort this spring has focused on our work for the Skokomish Tribe on the Tribe’s forestland located at the south end of Hood Canal. To help the Tribe achieve its management goals, we’ve completed a timber appraisal and are planning the first commercial thinning on tribal lands in a couple decades. NNRG is applying the “thin from below” method in the commercial timber harvest: harvesting smaller, suppressed trees and leaving the larger dominant trees with more light, space and nutrients to thrive. We’ll also be removing trees displaying signs of root rot to help reduce the spread of the

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Cedar Row Farm

Eve Lonnquist can often be found working in the woods, just like her grandmother, who bought Cedar Row Farm in 1919 for $2000 and planted its namesake row of cedars. Nestled in the Nehalem River foothills, the 160-acre forest is stewarded by Eve, her two brothers and her partner Lynn Baker. The family enjoys taking care of the land and balances multiple goals, including recreation and income from timber harvest as well as providing wildlife habitat. They are FSC-certified through NNRG’s group certificate and are members of the Oregon Woodland Cooperative, selling bundled firewood to grocery stores around the Portland

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FSC-Certified Northwest Forests

NNRG’s group certificate for forests meeting the Forest Stewardship Council® standards covers more than 190,000 acres in 86 different ownerships across Oregon and Washington. The forests certified by NNRG are depicted as dark blue circles in the map above. In addition, another 420,000 acres in the two states are certified under other auspices, including the South Puget planning unit of Washington Department of Natural Resources, EFM, the Coquille Tribe, the Collins Lakeview Forest, Joint Base Lewis-McChord, and Oregon-based forestry consultants Trout Mountain Forestry. For a list of lands that are FSC-certified through NNRG’s group certificate, click here. For a selection of NNRG member profiles, click here.

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Measuring Timber and Woody Biomass in San Juan Forests

Techniques to estimate the volume of timber and woody biomass in your forest Saturday, April 28, 2018 | 10:30a-5p | Lopez Island [button color=”accent-color” hover_text_color_override=”#fff” size=”medium” url=”https://www.eventbrite.com/e/measuring-timber-and-woody-biomass-in-san-juan-forests-tickets-41832873250″ text=”REGISTER TODAY!” color_override=””] Understanding which trees and how many to remove from your forest is critical to a successful thinning project. This workshop will introduce participants to strategies for installing forest inventory plots and collecting the right data to calculate timber volumes. Participants will learn how to distinguish trees that merchantable and options for utilizing non-merchantable woody biomass. This workshop is the second in a three-part series on woody biomass in the San Juans. All forest owners are

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Workshop: Energy Opportunities for Woody Biomass

Options for San Juans Forest Owners REGISTER TODAY! Woody biomass in densely stocked San Juan forests may present an opportunity to support local energy needs. This workshop will discuss examples of community-based energy projects from throughout the Pacific Northwest. Learn about the cost-effective methods for converting biomass into energy to heat and power our houses, businesses, and communities. Topics include: Energy uses for woody biomass Comparing woody biomass to conventional fuels Different forms of woody biomass: firewood to pellets to chips Community cooperative business models for woody biomass energy Heating public facilities with woody biomass Emissions and clean air concerns

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Workshop: Biochar 101-Making Biochar from Woody Biomass

Benefits for Farms and Forests Learn How to Make Biochar: REGISTER TODAY! Biochar, a charcoal made from woody biomass that stores carbon and improves soil, is an emerging option for forest owners to generate income and remove excess wood from densely stocked forests. Biochar can increase agricultural productivity, improve soil fertility, and help mitigate climate change. This workshop will take you through the steps to turn low-value branches, twigs, and other woody biomass into valuable biochar. We’ll also cover potential business strategies that are working for San Juan county biochar producers as well as findings in the latest biochar research. This

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Workshop: Utilizing Woody Biomass to Reduce Fire Risk

Fire Ecology and Active Management in San Juan Forests REGISTER TODAY! Many forests in the San Juan Islands are comprised of extremely dense small diameter trees. These dense stands are at high risk for forest fire, have stagnant growth and low timber quality, and present very poor wildlife habitat. This workshop will go over the history of island forests, the risks and problems with leaving dense forests unmanaged, and different active management strategies to reduce wildfire risk, enhance forest biodiversity, improve wildlife habitat, and generate income. This workshop is the first in a three-part series on woody biomass in the

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Workshop: How to Manage a Timber Sale – Jan. 21 & Feb. 4

Timber harvests conducted with care and good planning are an important management tool that can generate revenue while improving the quality and value of timber resources and wildlife habitat. Harvesting and selling timber is incredibly complex and can be challenging – incomplete planning without market knowledge can cost you thousands of dollars. By being well-informed about the value of timber, key questions to ask, and the logistics of harvesting and marketing logs, you can ensure a more efficient harvest operation that yields the ecological and economic results you want from your forest. This day-long workshop will introduce landowners to the

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Making Forests Healthier and Fire-Safe in the San Juan Islands

We are working with landowners in San Juan County to address the unique challenges of managing island forests for both ecological health and economic viability. Increasingly, forest owners in San Juan County are seeking guidance on how to manage their overstocked stands for improved forest health. They are also looking for creative ways to use the excess woody material that is a byproduct of restoration. For the past six years, NNRG and our partners have worked in many island forests, conducting one-on-one site visits, developing management plans, and hosting tours and classes. In 2018, we are hosting a series of workshops

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Enjoying FSC®-certified Forests

“It is not so much for its beauty that the forest makes a claim upon men’s hearts, as for that subtle something, that quality of air that emanates from old trees, that so wonderfully changes and renews a weary spirit.” – Robert Louis Stevenson In any season, spending time in a forest nurtures renewal and fosters well being. Spring bursts with verdant growth and abundant wildlife, summer thrives with bright sun and long days, autumn manifests strikings colors and abundant harvest, and winter offers profound stillness and reflective silence. Hiking in well-managed forests deepens this experience as one sees first-hand the diversity

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Member Spotlight: Wooded Retreat at Two Frog Bog

A walk along the winding path of Raven’s Trail at Two Frog Bog finds many visitors shedding the stress and grind of hurried lives and pausing to absorb the beautiful details found within the forest. Elona Kafton loves her 20-acre woods in the Rainier foothills outside of Roy, WA. She and her family nurture an oasis where people and wildlife recharge. Taking a stroll with Elona from her backyard permaculture garden into the forest is an immersive delight for one’s senses. Soon all focus is on clusters of golden brown mushrooms glistening with recent rain, red rosehips shining like polished jewels, verdant green

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2017 Native Plant Sales

The wet season is the perfect time to plant young trees, native shrubs, and flowers! When it comes to planting, timing is important. At lower elevations, planting in late fall or early winter gives plants a head start. In mid-elevation areas, late winter and early spring is the time to put new trees and shrubs in the ground. Planting before the start of the spring growing season helps ensure survival as small plants have time to recover from the shock of transplanting. That way, they can focus on growing roots that connect them to nutrients and water in the soil, and have

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Stewardship: Just Call It Love

Christine Johnson (with her husband Terrigal) has loved forests all her life. As NNRG’s board chair, she helps us work to protect the health, resilience, and character of these incredible places, share her love of Northwest woodlands every step along the way. Her 10-acre, FSC®-certified forest on Waldron Island is a living testament to Christine’s stewardship. Learn more about Christine and her journey:

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Celebrating Success: Improving Skagit Forests for Fish

The iconic Skagit Watershed provides critical resources to the Pacific Northwest region, including timber, food, and fish. Northwest Natural Resource Group (NNRG), Washington State Department of Natural Resources (DNR), and our partners are proud to celebrate the completion of a three-year project working with Skagit forest owners to protect habitat for the five salmon species that call the Skagit River system home. Family forest owners are maintaining good roads, removing barriers to fish passage, and protecting riparian buffers. These stewardship activities are helping sustain and restore the health of streams and forests in the Skagit basin and other priority watersheds in Puget

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Cedar Row Farm in The New York Times!

Cedar Row Farm is a gorgeous 160-acre FSC-certified forest in Oregon that has been a member of Northwest Certified Forestry since 2013. A wonderful recent piece in The New York Times highlights Eve Lonnquist and Lynn Baker’s incredible efforts to protect a century of family history. Tapping into carbon markets is an income option the family is considering to diversify their income and protect Cedar Row Farm for future generations. “Maybe I’d just be at home growing carbon,” says Lonnquist. “And maybe that’s the best thing.” Read the full story here! Photos: Leah Nash for The New York Times

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Workshop: Discovering Value in Your Forest – Sept. 24 & Oct. 8

The diverse forests of the Pacific Northwest are home to trees, plants, lichens, fungi and other organisms that are prized for many different uses.   Woodland owners can steward their land to yield a range of highly-valued products including materials for food, wild crafting, medicinal plants, firewood, and specialty-wood products such as figured wood, veneer, and pole-quality timber. In this class you’ll learn about Pacific Northwest plants that you can steward on your land for food,  craft, and traditional uses. You’ll also learn about niche markets available to forest owners and differences between selling a veneer-grade log at pulp prices instead of the

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