Tag: forest management practices

Funding Fuel Reduction and Forest Health Projects

Depending on the state of your forest, fuel reduction and forest slash treatments may be ways you can improve your forest’s health and fire resilience. We’ve identified cost-share programs, funding, and other resources, as well as information on how to do-it-yourself. Forest slash treatment is becoming a necessity in many forests due to historic fire suppression and the trees and vegetation that have grown since (more dense, often comprised of more species less resistant to fire). Fire suppression has led to many overstocked forests that become serious fire hazards during the increasingly dry summer season. Methods to reduce fire fuels range from removal

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Workshop: How to Manage a Timber Sale – August 15

Harvesting and marketing timber can be one of the most rewarding experiences of owning forestland… it can also be one of the most challenging. On Saturday, August 15, join us for a workshop to learn how to manage a timber sale on your land and effectively market your wood products. This day-long seminar will introduce landowners to the steps involved in setting up and managing a timber sale. Participants will be better prepared to manage a timber sale and more familiar with resources for assistance. All woodland owners are encouraged to attend regardless of past workshop experience. Harvesting timber is an important management tool. When done with care

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Crystal Lake Tree Farm – a community and a classroom

On June 23, I was fortunate enough to attend a forest health workshop at the location. It was a lovely night to be outside as we tromped up and down the road of Crystal Lake Tree Farm. Settled on 400 acres in suburban Woodinville, WA, its location is merely one special aspect of the tree farm. The tree farm is a sustainably-managed community forest that surrounds Crystal Lake, where 66 families live and own a lot of their own land. I soon met Ron Munro, the man behind this unique place. Unassuming and vastly knowledgeable, he reminds me of my

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Build Local Alliance’s Summer Tour – June 27

The Build Local Alliance (BLA) is a network of foresters, land stewards, millwrights, craftsmen, contractors, and architects interested in creating with wood from well-managed forests in Oregon and SW Washington. Each season BLA hosts a talk or field trip to connect our community of practitioners. We share ideas, showcase projects, and often enjoy well-crafted beer! NNRG is a supporting member of BLA. This summer, on June 27, we’ll be touring NestWood Forest in Corbett, OR and visiting some building projects in Portland that incorporated local wood. As always, there will be time to do some good networking. Space is limited, so register now to reserve your spot. Lunch

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Spring time in the San Juans

NNRG returned to the San Juans this spring, this time assisting Camp Orkila prepare for pre-commercial thinning as well as develop a forest management plan for Satellite Island. Kirk Hanson, Director of Forestry, spent the better part of a day on Satellite Island, a 116-acre remote camping island owned by the YMCA that is nestled along the northern side of Stuart Island, approximately 8 miles NW of Orcas Island.     The YMCA received EQIP funding to hire NNRG to develop a forest management plan for Satellite Island. Camp Orkila acquired Satellite Island in the late 1940’s as a gift from the

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Wetset Enterprises

Wetset Enterprises, Mossyrock, WA By Kirk Hanson Thomas Wolfe once famously stated that “you can’t go home again”.  NCF member Micheal Hurley begs to differ as he gradually exchanges a 30-year career that took him all over the world for the woods of his childhood.  Nestled into the headwaters of Salmon Creek in the foothills of the Cascade Mountains southwest of Mossyrock, Hurley has pieced together over 120 acres of exceptionally diverse forestland from which he is now creating as much of a living as he is a lifestyle. Hurley is a native to southwest Washington.  “I was raised cutting

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