Author: Outreach

Getting to the Root (Rot) of the Forest

Phil Aponte has always loved forests.  When he was an interpretive ranger for Mount Rainier National Park, Phil had the chance to walk the woods with renowned forest ecologist Dr. Jerry Franklin. Jerry took a group of park rangers into a stand of old-growth forest and had the rangers lie down to observe their surroundings. As Jerry spoke, Phil recalls spotting a flying squirrel in the trees and feeling a great sense of peace. In that moment he knew he would steward a forest someday. Grove of the Patriarchs at Mount Rainier National Park. Photo by Jeff Gunn via Flickr

Continue »

Meet NNRG Forester Marcia Rosenquist!

This January NNRG was lucky enough to add Marcia Rosenquist to its forestry team. Marcia works with forest landowners to create ecological forest management plans based on their goals and objectives. She’s improving the health and resilience of Pacific Northwest forest land one small parcel at a time!

Continue »

2019 Accomplishments By the Numbers

2019 was a productive year for NNRG and the forests our members steward! We are so inspired by the landowners and managers in our community who worked to enhance habitat for threatened and endangered species, removed invasive species, planted a diverse array of native seedlings and shrubs, and pursued new markets for local wood products. Many thanks to this dedicated community of ecologically-minded forest owners, land managers and NNRG’s partners who steward biodiverse forests and contribute to the regional economy. Here are some highlights of 2019: Accomplishments Hosted 7 workshops on ecologically-based forest management, fuels reduction, biochar creation, FSC certification,

Continue »

2020 Winter/Spring Native Plant Sales

The winter wet season in the Pacific Northwest is an ideal time to plant young trees and native shrubs! Planting native trees and shrubs enhances forest biodiversity by providing habitat for wildlife and forage for pollinators. It’s also a great way connect to the land and increase your aesthetic and recreational appreciation for the forest.

Continue »

The (Life and) Death Cycle of the Salmon

Edit
If you’re hoping to spot salmon in the forest this season, a creek or river is your best bet. But if you limit your searches to fin-spotting at the water’s edge, you’re missing out on the full experience. Don’t forget to look to the trees.

Continue »

Olympia Workshop: Climate Adaptation Strategies for Pacific Northwest Forests

Climate Adaptation Strategies for Pacific Northwest Forests What Natural Resource Professionals and Land Managers Need to Know Climate change poses significant challenges for small forest owners in the Northwest. NNRG is hosting this workshop to help foresters and other land managers consider climate adaptation concepts and strategies in their management practices to meet their clients’ goals and sustain forests into the future. There are many actions land managers can take to improve a forest’s resilience to climate change. Most management strategies and tactics that help forests adapt to and become resilient to climate change are already commonly used practices and

Continue »

Stewarding Woodlands in a Changing Climate

Ben Deumling and his family steward Zena Forest, a member of NNRG’s group FSC® certificate. The largest contiguous block of forest in the Eola Hills of the Willamette Valley, Zena Forest has not been immune to the impacts of climate change. Facing large-scale Douglas-fir die-off, Ben describes below how he and his family are experimenting with planting less-traditional tree species—ones more tolerant to a warming climate.

Continue »

Seeking Forest Owners for New Study

You know better than anyone what kind of management work you’ve done in your forest, and what sorts of financial and ecological results its produced. Your closest forest-owning neighbor might have taken a different approach but ended up with similar results.

Continue »

Skokomish Tribal Forest Certified

The Skokomish Indian Tribe has earned Forest Stewardship Council® certification for its 2,100-acre forest at the south end of Hood Canal, making it the first tribe in Washington state to gain that endorsement.The Skokomish Tribe join three other Indian tribes in the United States in maintaining FSC® certification: the Coquille Tribe in Oregon, the Hoopa Valley Tribal Council in California, and the Menominee in Wisconsin.

Continue »