Tag: Stewardship

Northwest Watershed Institute’s Tarboo Forest

Restoring Tarboo Creek and protecting its headwaters has been a decades-long community-wide conservation effort to ensure that both forest and stream flourish for fish and wildlife.   Northwest Watershed Institute (NWI), a Port Townsend-based non-profit, leads the work to regrow old-growth forests in the uplands of Tarboo Creek and re-establish forested wetlands in the floodplain. Over the years, NWI has quilted together Tarboo Wildlife Preserve, 396 acres in the Tarboo valley near Quilicene, Washington. The Tarboo preserve is part of a 4,600-acre patchwork of protected lands that include both public and private ownerships around Dabob Bay along the north end

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Member Spotlight: Butler Family Forest

Paul Butler has had a life-long love of forests. Now that he and his wife steward their own forest they’ve taken steps to care for and enjoy their land. Paul tells us how his relationship with his woods has deepened over time and what actions he’s taking to make the forest healthy.

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Workshop: Energy Opportunities for Woody Biomass

Options for San Juans Forest Owners REGISTER TODAY! Woody biomass in densely stocked San Juan forests may present an opportunity to support local energy needs. This workshop will discuss examples of community-based energy projects from throughout the Pacific Northwest. Learn about the cost-effective methods for converting biomass into energy to heat and power our houses, businesses, and communities. Topics include: Energy uses for woody biomass Comparing woody biomass to conventional fuels Different forms of woody biomass: firewood to pellets to chips Community cooperative business models for woody biomass energy Heating public facilities with woody biomass Emissions and clean air concerns

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Workshop: Biochar 101-Making Biochar from Woody Biomass

Benefits for Farms and Forests Learn How to Make Biochar: REGISTER TODAY! Biochar, a charcoal made from woody biomass that stores carbon and improves soil, is an emerging option for forest owners to generate income and remove excess wood from densely stocked forests. Biochar can increase agricultural productivity, improve soil fertility, and help mitigate climate change. This workshop will take you through the steps to turn low-value branches, twigs, and other woody biomass into valuable biochar. We’ll also cover potential business strategies that are working for San Juan county biochar producers as well as findings in the latest biochar research. This

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By the Numbers: 2016 Accomplishments

2016 was an incredible year for Northwest Certified Forestry members and the forests they steward. Because of the dedicated community of ecologically-minded woodland owners, Pacific Northwest forests are healthier, more resilient homes for wildlife and people alike. Here are some highlights of our year: Accomplishments: We hosted 11 workshops on ecologically-based forest management, precision tree-felling, forest monitoring, and programs for natural resource professionals and engaged 267 participants. We conducted more than 92 site visits to forest landowners – including NCF members and beginning woodland owners. We completed 6 ecologically-based thinning projects across 65 acres We oversaw 4 forest restoration projects involving inter-planting, pre-commercial

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Workshop: Utilizing Woody Biomass to Reduce Fire Risk

Fire Ecology and Active Management in San Juan Forests REGISTER TODAY! Many forests in the San Juan Islands are comprised of extremely dense small diameter trees. These dense stands are at high risk for forest fire, have stagnant growth and low timber quality, and present very poor wildlife habitat. This workshop will go over the history of island forests, the risks and problems with leaving dense forests unmanaged, and different active management strategies to reduce wildfire risk, enhance forest biodiversity, improve wildlife habitat, and generate income. This workshop is the first in a three-part series on woody biomass in the

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Stewardship: Just Call It Love

Christine Johnson (with her husband Terrigal) has loved forests all her life. As NNRG’s board chair, she helps us work to protect the health, resilience, and character of these incredible places, share her love of Northwest woodlands every step along the way. Her 10-acre, FSC®-certified forest on Waldron Island is a living testament to Christine’s stewardship. Learn more about Christine and her journey:

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Workshop: Ecological Forestry 101: Intro to Silviculture and Wildlife – June 4 & 11

Woodland owners in the Pacific Northwest are interested in maintaining forests that provide a broad range of ecological functions and economic goals. Enjoying wildlife and providing wildlife habitat are often motivators for stewarding woodlands. It’s important to understand how the habitat in your forest meets the needs of particular wildlife species and what you can do to maintain and enhance your forest for biodiversity. Many Northwest forests are in need of active forest management to create the complex forest structure, light for flowering plants, and space for food-producing shrubs that help wildlife thrive. Careful stewardship can help you to perpetually manage your forest on a

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Member Spotlight: Giving back to forest, creek, and community

Camp Myrtlewood brings together a community dedicated to stewardship, environmental education, and fellowship. Just a few miles upstream from the confluence of the Middle Fork Coquille River and Myrtle Creek, Camp Myrtlewood includes 124 acres of temperate rainforest that is Forest Stewardship Council® certified through NNRG’s FSC® group certificate. Tucked away in the Coast Range of southern Oregon, the retreat center and hospitality ministry of the Church of the Brethren draws people from throughout the Northwest. The camp’s leadership and volunteers strive to give back to the forest and river that sustain the camp (making every day Earth Day at

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Spring: Forestry through the Seasons

Greet the return of the growing season! The nesting season begins around March 15, so try to avoid any major timber management until chicks have left their nests around June 15. The window for planting is closing: make sure you get your tree seedlings and native plants safely in the ground by early April. By tending your plants, nurturing your wildlife, and walking your woods, you can enhance biodiversity, bolster habitat, and prepare for active summer management. Tend your Plants Buy native plants – find a sale near you. Plant seedlings by early April – learn more. Prune before dormancy ends

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From stump to Stumptown

The farm-to-table movement resonates with citizens of the Pacific Northwest. We shop at local farmers markets, participate in CSAs, buy eggs from our neighbors who raise chickens. We care so much about where our food comes from – and its well-being – that the show Portlandia pokes fun at us Oregonians and Washingtonians wanting to “meet the chicken” on our plate. But can we extend the farm-to-table concept to the next level of sustainable sourcing? Forest-to-building? Stump-to-siding? Tree-to-floor? At NNRG, we believe it’s important to have confidence and take comfort in knowing where our wood products come from. Meeting the stump and walking through the forest from which the

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Member Spotlight: Shiitake Mushroom Logs

In our Member Spotlight series, we highlight Northwest Certified Forestry (NCF) members who have used forest products for unique and entrepreneurial purposes on their land and within their communities. Often these projects help members earn supplemental income. For the second installment in the series, we introduce you to Gopher Valley Botanicals, a Forest Stewardship Council® certified member of our group certificate, who has sourced non-timber forest products from her woods to local markets. Gopher Valley Botanicals   Located amid the rolling foothills of Yamhill County in the western Willamette Valley, Gopher Valley Botanicals (GVB) stewards a 20-acre forest comprised of Douglas-fir, Oregon white oak, and a wooded wetland. The landowners take an active management

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Announcement: 2016 EQIP Deadline Extension – October 16, 2015

Update! The 2016 EQIP Deadline in WA has been extended until October 16, 2015. That means you now have more time to develop your project proposals! EQIP is a cost-share reimbursement program that helps forest owners pay for a certain amount of a conservation practice by reimbursing landowners for a percentage of agreed to costs. UPDATE: The OR EQIP deadline is January 15, 2016. If you are interested in learning more about the EQIP program in general, visit our EQIP page. To learn more about the EQIP program in your state check out: NRCS EQIP information in Oregon NRCS EQIP information in Washington In addition to EQIP,

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Growing biologically rich forests for wildlife and income

On a beautiful summer day in early June, woodland owners gathered inside the library at Sedro-Woolley High School for the Managing for Timber and Wildlife workshop. The more than 20 participants were there to learn from Rolf Gersonde and Ken Bevis, two experts in the fields of silviculture and wildlife biology. Rolf Gersonde, a renowned silviculturist and researcher for the City of Seattle’s Cedar River Watershed presented first, focusing mainly on sustainable forest management practices. He explained that creating stands that are diverse in age, class, and species would not only serve as sanctuary to many different types of wildlife but would also

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Drought and your forest

Temperatures in Washington and Oregon continue to be above average and much of the Pacific Northwest is experiencing severe drought. Go for a walk in the woods and chances are you’ll notice  it’s a lot more dusty, the plants and trees are shedding leaves and dropping limbs; typically we’d expect dried leaves and dropped limbs after the first storms of autumn, but happening mid-summer these are are signs that the forest is trying to conserve water. Our forests are feeling the effects of these prolonged hot, dry days. At the landscape level there is increased risk of wildlife and at the individual tree drought stress decreases

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Funding Forest Stewardship – Enhance Forest Health

For the third installment in the Funding Your Forest series, we’re focusing on ways to improve the diversity and productivity of your forest. Stewarding a forest that is diverse in species, age and size classes, with appropriate stocking densities is beneficial to the entire ecosystem – supporting resilience to diseases and pests, and boosts overall productivity. So to speak – it diversifies your forest’s investment portfolio. The objective of enhancing forest health can be accomplished in a variety of ways and typically includes: pre-commercial thinning, planting native trees and shrubs, and removing invasive species – mechanically or chemically. For example, forest stand improvement (EQIP code 666), or pre-commercial thinning, entails removing individual trees

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Funding Forest Stewardship – Fuel reduction and forest health

For the second installment in the Funding Your Forest series, we will be discussing fuel reduction and forest slash treatment as a means to improve forest health. We’ve identified cost-share programs, funding, and other resources, as well as information on how to do-it-yourself. We’re timing this series with the cutoff for 2016 EQIP funding in Washington State. This year, the Washington EQIP deadline is October 16, 2015. In Oregon, the cutoff to apply for 2016 funding is still to be determined. (We’ll keep folks updated.) Forest slash treatment is becoming a necessity in many forests due to historic fire suppression

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Point Defiance Park – a living museum

Point Defiance Park is as rare as it is gorgeous. No where else can one find 500 acres of old-growth forest along the shore of Puget Sound and all within the city of Tacoma. The forest is interwoven with walking and running trails, bike paths, and picnic areas that provide a serene reprieve from the urban bustle just beyond its shady canopy. Excellent stewardship on the part of Metro Parks Tacoma is to credit for the forest’s preservation. The agency manages parks all over the city, but Point Defiance stands out within Tacoma – and the Puget Sound region – because it is Forest

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The Good Wood Tour – July 30

Interested in building sustainably? Want to know the difference between FSC-certified and conventional forest products? Then come to the Good Wood Tour! On July 30th, NNRG and others will be co-hosting the first of a two-part event that will increase participants’ understanding of sustainable forestry and FSC products as an important component of green building. The event will include day tours to an FSC-certified forest as well as industrial, institutional, and residential buildings that utilized a large percentage of FSC-certified wood in their construction. Strategies to increase demand for sustainable forestry products and promote them as a green building solution will also

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Partnership in the Skagit Watershed

The iconic Skagit Watershed is important to all of us for its production of timber, food, and fisheries. It is also significant in that it is the only river system in the Puget Sound region to support all five species of Pacific salmon. The Washington State Department of Natural Resources (DNR) and Northwest Natural Resource Group (NNRG) are collaborating to help woodland owners assess forest health and evaluate stream habitat and forest roads. Through this partnership we are reaching out to landowners in the Skagit Watershed to provide one-on-one site visits, workshops, and technical assistance. This project is supported by our partners: Skagit Conservation District,

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